Energy & Environmental Law Blog

Energy & Environmental Law Blog

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D.C Circuit Court of Appeals Vacates Affordable Clean Energy Rule

Posted in Energy, Environment

On January 19, 2021, the United States Court of Appeals for the D. C. Circuit issued an Order vacating U.S. EPA’s 2019 Affordable Clean Energy Rule (ACE Rule). The 2019 ACE Rule replaced the 2015 Clean Power Plan as a means of regulating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from power plants. The Court held that, while U.S. EPA has the authority to regulate GHG emissions, “the central operative terms of the ACE Rule . . . hinged on a fundamental misconstruction of Section 7411(d) of the Clean Air Act.” The Court also held that the extended compliance schedules for reducing GHG emissions under the ACE Rule are arbitrary and capricious.

Per the Court’s Order, the ball is back in U.S. EPA’s court to develop and implement a new regulatory framework for GHG emissions from power plants. We will continue to monitor this issue and will report on any new developments.

Supreme Court of Ohio Construe’s State’s Saltwater Injection Well Permitting Scheme

Posted in Energy

In a recent mandamus action, the Supreme Court of Ohio had the opportunity to construe Ohio’s saltwater injection well permitting scheme. See State ex rel. Omni Energy Group, L.L.C. v. Ohio Dept. of Natural Resources, Div. of Oil & Gas Resources Mgt., Slip Opinion No. 2020-Ohio-5581. In Omni, the Court discussed whether (1) the Division of Oil & Gas Resources Management had the right to call a public meeting concerning Omni’s permit application, (2) Omni had a right to compel the Division to rule on the validity of objections received to its permit application, and (3) the Division could schedule a hearing on those objections after a certain statutory deadline expired. You can read the Court’s decision here.

Registration Renewal Update for Ohio’s Land Professionals

Posted in Energy

The Ohio Department of Commerce, Division of Real Estate & Professional Licensing (the “Division”), recently informed Ohio’s “land professionals” (i.e., oil and gas landmen registered with the Division) that their current registrations remain valid until July 1, 2021 pursuant to House Bill 404. In order to maintain their registrations, land professionals must renew them no later than July 1, 2021.

However, the Division warned land professionals that H.B. 404 does not include an extension for renewals due after April 1, 2021. Thus, land professionals annual 2021 renewal is due no later than April 30, 2021.

 

U.S EPA Publishes Final Rule Overturning ‘Once In, Always In’ Policy for Major Sources of HAPs

Posted in Energy, Environment

This post is an update to our October 2, 2020 blog post regarding U.S EPA’s final rule overturning U.S. EPA’s ‘Once In, Always In’ policy for major sources of hazardous air pollutants. Notably, the final rule was published in the November 19, 2020 Federal Register and, thus, the rule becomes effective on January 19, 2021.

Please contact us with any questions or for assistance regarding your facility’s permitting and emission requirements in light of U.S. EPA’s new rule.

Upcoming Deadline for Renewal of Ohio Land Professional Registrations

Posted in Energy

The Ohio Department of Commerce, Division of Real Estate & Professional Licensing, recently reached out to Ohio’s “land professionals” (i.e., oil and gas landmen registered with the Division) concerning the renewal of their registrations. Pursuant to House Bill 197, land professionals must file their renewal paperwork with the Division on or before December 1, 2020. Failure to file by December 1, 2020 will result in the expiration of the land professional’s registration. Those land professionals who have not yet filed their renewal paperwork can expect a reminder letter from the Division around the end of October, 2020.

Supreme Court of Ohio Accepts Appeals from Fifth and Seventh District Courts of Appeals in Oil and Gas Title Cases

Posted in Energy

On September 29, 2020, the Supreme Court of Ohio accepted appeals from the Fifth District Court of Appeals’ decisions in Peppertree Farms, L.L.C. v. Thonen, Case No. 2020-Ohio-3042, and Peppertree Farms, L.L.C. v. Thonen, Case No. 2020-Ohio-3043, as well as the Seventh District Court of Appeals’ decision in Fonzi v. Miller, Case No. 2020-Ohio-3739.  In the Thonen cases, the Court will address whether the Ohio Dormant Mineral Act (R.C. 5301.56) supersedes and controls over the Ohio Marketable Title Act (R.C. 5301.47, et seq.) as to the termination of severed oil and gas interests.  In Miller, the Court will address several issues related to the application of the Ohio Dormant Mineral Act (R.C. 5301.56), including the level of due diligence required before serving a notice of abandonment by publication.  Both cases are on pause for now: The Court held the Thonen cases until it decides West v. Bode, Case No. 2019-1494, and Miller until it decides Gerrity v. Chervenak, Case No. 2019-1123.

U.S. EPA Issues Final Rule Overturning ‘Once In, Always In’ Policy for Major Sources of Hazardous Air Pollutants

Posted in Energy, Environment

This post provides an important update to our January 2018 Client Alert regarding U.S. EPA’s ‘Once In, Always In’ policy for major sources of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). On October 1, 2020, U.S. EPA issued a final rule amending the general provisions of the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), at 40 CFR Part 63, Subpart A.

The final rule implements the plain language reading for the definitions of “major source” and “area source” under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act (CAA). Notably, the final rule also amends the NESHAP applicability provision in 40 CFR 63.1 by adding a new paragraph – (c)(6) – that specifies that a major source can be reclassified as an area source at any time upon limiting its potential to emit HAP to below the major source threshold of 10 tons/year for any single HAP and 25 tons/year of any combination of HAP. Once the reclassification becomes effective, the source is subject to any applicable area source NESHAP requirements in 40 CFR Part 63. U.S. EPA’s final rule effectively codifies a January 25, 2018 guidance document reversing the Agency’s long-standing controversial policy that any facility subject to major source NESHAP requirements would always remain subject to those requirements, even if the facility’s processes changed or controls were implemented that eliminated or permanently reduced that facility’s potential to emit HAP.

Facilities in a position to take advantage of reclassification under U.S EPA’s final rule should be mindful of the new notification procedures and record keeping and reporting requirements under the final rule. Please contact us with any questions or for assistance regarding your facility’s permitting and emission requirements.

A pre-publication version of the final rule is available here. The final rule will become effective 60 days after it is published in the Federal Register.

Supreme Court of Ohio Sides with Injection-Well Operator in Takings Case

Posted in Energy

On September 23, 2020, the Supreme Court of Ohio ruled that fact issues prevented a lower court from granting summary judgment to the State of Ohio on a takings claim involving the indefinite suspension of a Trumbull County injection well.  See State ex rel. AWMS Water Solutions, L.L.C. v. Mertz, 2020-Ohio-4509.

Read more about this decision after the break.

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